Skincare Company Launches First-Ever Drinkable Sunscreen

 

image via It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia

image via It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia

Just in time for summer, Colorado-based Osmosis Skin Care is promoting its drinkable sunscreen.
Take a few swigs of its UV Neutralizer Harmonized Water and in an hour your skin will radiate sun-blocking waves that neutralize 97% of the sun’s UV rays, or so goes the company’s claim.
Is it too good to be true?

osmosis-skincares-uv-cancelling-water-therapy

 

Well I’m no doctor, but…
The ingredients are listed as distilled water and the company’s proprietary blend of ‘multiple vibrational frequencies.’ According to Osmosis Skin Care, they’ve identified the precise vibrational frequencies—basically radio waves—that neutralize ultraviolet radiation. They infuse hundreds of thousands of vibrations into distilled water, and then they bottle it up. When you drink the solution, the vibrations are shared with the body’s own fluids at a cellular level and then the vibrations are emitted through your skin where they repel sunlight. Got that?

Each 2 milliliter dose lasts for 4 hours before you have to chug some more, and a 100-ml bottle of UV Neutralizer Harmonized Water retails for $30. Since it’s marketed as a cosmetic, the FDA hasn’t reviewed the product, although some of the other products in the Osmosis line have received approval in Kenya.

Harmonized waters might be hard to swallow, but you can eat your way to sun protection.
There’s no shortage of legitimate, peer-reviewed clinical studies documenting the skin-protecting qualities of a carotenoid-rich diet. Carotenoids are members of a family of nutrients that contribute sun blocking pigments to plants and animals. When carotenoids are in the foods we eat, the pigments are deposited in our skin where they prevent sunburn and the kind of oxidative stress that leads to skin cancer. It’s a measurable level that a dietician can assess with a laser scan of your skin.

Carotenoids are why frogs are green and flamingos are pink. They put the yellow in egg yolks and turn a cooked lobster red. Dark chocolate and green tea are good sources of dietary carotenoids, as are most deeply colored fruits and vegetables like squash, sweet potatoes, carrots, apricots, and dark green leafy greens, and the colorful flesh of salmon and trout.

A thorough explanation of dietary carotenoids along with the carotenoid content of dozens of foods can be found at the online at the Micronutrient Information Center at the Linus Pauling Institute of Oregon State University.

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