Requiem for a Foodie

nailDo you know what that is?
It’s the final nail in the foodie coffin.
The word has run its course. There’s no doubt about it.

Here’s the unequivocal, undeniable proof    finger right    foodies billboard

You’re looking at a billboard erected on a Michigan roadside. McDonald’s has launched a campaign for its new Bacon Clubhouse sandwich with the tagline foodies welcome.

That’s right, foodies, come on in to Mickey D’s.
The poster child for the salt, fat, and high-fructose corn syrup of factory farmed, heavily processed foods now speaks your language with its artisan-bunned thick-cut applewood smoked bacon burger.

Foodie was once the juvenile but still proud name for a gustatory explorer, someone with genuine passion and even a hint of a rebellious spirit.
The early foodies broke with the old-guard; they separated fine food and wine from its context of formality and its singular attachment to French cuisine. A Chinatown noodle joint could achieve the same stature as haute cuisine on the Upper East Side. A single peach could be as sublimely pleasurable as a Grand Marnier soufflé. The true foodie could properly enjoy both.

Today’s foodie is a different breed.
Years of over-hyped foodism took care of that, treating food as an emblem of status and lifestyle and turning the food-loving foodies into conspicuous consumers of consumption. The McDonald’s promotion can’t be blamed for tarnishing the image of foodies. That damage was already done. The foodie moniker, for a while now, has stood for nothing more than an overweening interest in food accompanied by self-involved, romanticized pretentions. By co-opting the name, the fast food giant is just helping it along to its deservedly early grave.

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