Food Trucks For Dogs Have Arrived

[image via K99]

[image via K99]

 

Seriously. Food trucks for dogs.
They roll through neighborhoods and downtown streets drawing four-legged foodies with cat meows and cow moos played over PA systems. Menus lean toward meat-flavored ice cream and peanut butter baked goods, and rely heavily on punny names like poochi sushi, spaghetti and muttballs, and chicken with grrr-avy.

Chicago’s Arrfscarf peddles meaty treats like bacon macaroons and beef brisket-flavored frozen yogurt. Central Florida’s Sit ‘n Stay Mobile Pet Cafe serves beef jerky sushi and meatballs made from locally raised, grass-fed beef and lamb. Tiki’s Playhouse cruises the streets of Baltimore scooping $3 cups of Frozen Woofy’s Treats in flavors like Barkin’ Berry and Banana Rama Ding Dong—described by one dog owner as “flavors which would be interesting to me if I were a dog.” And it’s not just a local phenomenon. Big players in pet food are jumping into the trend. Rachael Ray launched her pet food line Nutrish with a food truck that dished out samples of Chicken Paw Pie and Beef Stroganwoof on the streets of Manhattan, and Chef Michael’s Food Truck for Dogs is a project of Nestle Purina PetCare.

Dog owners are known to complain about the limited dining options for pets. They protest health code-imposed restaurant bans and push to expand access to street fairs and farmers markets. A survey of dog owners revealed that 84 percent believe that mealtime is a perfect opportunity to show their dog how much they love him or her. Food trucks finally provide them with the opportunity to share their dining passions with their pets.

Did someone forget that dogs are also fond of eating socks and cat feces?
For all of our own foodie-isms projected on pets, the fact is that dogs have a mere fraction of our taste buds and they will pretty much eat anything. We’re really just projecting our own culinary sensibilities. The problem is we’re also sharing our taste for high-protein, high-fat diets. It should come as no surprise that dogs, just like their human owners, are fat: about half of all dogs in American homes are overweight or obese.

We teach our dogs to heel and to roll over. Now they have to learn that they can’t always have a chicken sorbet.

 

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